Why You Should Only Use Natural Fibres (And The Consequences of Wearing Synthetic Fibres)

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We are proud to offer a range of fabrics made with the following natural fibres. 

  Bamboo

Bamboo

  Cotton

Cotton

  Cashmere

Cashmere

  Hemp

Hemp

  Wool

Wool

  Linen

Linen

  Mohair

Mohair

  Vicuna

Vicuna

  Silk

Silk

Benefits

  • Breathability - The average person looses about 4 cups of pespiration in a day and so it is vital that the clothing we wear is able to breathe. Natural fibre textiles absorb perspiration and release it into the air, a process called "wicking" that creates natural ventilation. Because of their more compact molecular structure, synthetic fibres cannot capture air and "breathe" in the same way. The "breathability" of natural fibre textiles makes their wearers less prone to skin rashes, itching and allergies often caused by synthetics. 
  • Natural Insulator - The bends, or crimp, in natural fibres like wool trap pockets of air which act as insulators against both cold and heat – Bedouins wear thin wool to keep them cool. Since natural fibres can absorb liquids, natural fibers efficiently absorb and disperse water lost through perspiration during the day.
  • Long Lasting - Synthetic fabric begins to break down much more quickly, especially with frequent washing. I’ve noticed that the fabric begins to “pill” – the fabric breaks down and gets fuzzy. With proper care and maintanance, natural fabric can last a lot longer and is a much better investment.
  • Non-Toxic - When it comes to body care products and cosmetics, we know that 60% of what we put on our skin is absorbed into the bloodstream. If clothes are treated with chemicals, and then we put the clothes on our skin, will our skin absorb some of the chemicals? Synthetic fabrics use a lot of dangerous chemicals that may eventually be absorbed into our bloodstream.
  • Sustainable - Natural fibres are a renewable resource, par excellence – they have been renewed by nature and human ingenuity for millennia. They are also carbon neutral: they absorb the same amount of carbon dioxide they produce. During processing, they generate mainly organic wastes and leave residues that can be used to generate electricity or make ecological housing material. And, at the end of their life cycle, they are 100% biodegradable.